Sunday, May 31: The Museum is open and parking is accessible during the CicLAvia bike event. For road closure information, visit: www.ciclavia.org

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A Revolution of the Palette: The First Synthetic Blues and their Impact on French Artists

July 17, 2015 - January 04, 2016


    Pasadena, CA
    —The Norton Simon Museum presents an exhibition that traces the effects of three synthetic blue pigments on French artists. The accidental discovery of Prussian blue in an alchemist’s laboratory around 1704 helped open up new possibilities for artistic expression at the dawn of the Enlightenment. Through stunning works from the Simon’s collection, alongside a handful of loans, A Revolution of the Palette explores the use of this pigment, followed by the introduction of cobalt blue and synthetic ultramarine, by French artists from the Rococo period to the threshold of Impressionism.

    A new palette available to artists, thanks largely to the addition of Prussian blue in the 18th century, helped fuel the heated philosophical debates regarding Newtonian color theory. The fascinating new capabilities of artists to exploit sophisticated color relationships based on scientific optical principles became a core precept of Rococo painting, or peinture moderne as it was called at the time. Exquisite examples of the early use of Prussian blue by Fragonard and his immediate circle demonstrate their technical achievements. Paintings by Vigée-Lebrun, Prud’hon and Ingres show the masterful use of Prussian blue as Neoclassicism took hold. The sophisticated, subtle manipulations of color in academic painting of the period, exemplified by Ducis’ Sappho Recalled to Life by the Charm of Music and Degas’ early and ambitious emulation of a Poussin composition, The Rape of the Sabines, rely heavily on the ability of the new blues to deftly modulate tone and hue in ways never available to earlier painters.

    As revolutionary as this new greenish-blue color proved to be, Prussian blue was a mere precursor to the explosion of available colors brought about by the Industrial Revolution. Indeed, the French government played an active role in catalyzing innovation at the dawn of the 19th century, as the country emerged from the Revolution with its economy in disarray. The newly appointed administrator of the Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory, Alexandre Brongniart (1770–1847), oversaw chemist Louis Jacques Thénard’s development of the next synthetic blue, a vivid cobalt blue pigment, inspired by the traditional cobalt oxide blue glazes seen on 18th-century Sèvres porcelain. An exquisite lidded vase on loan from the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens illustrates this.

    The third synthetic blue to emerge was the culmination of centuries of searching for a cheap, plentiful, high-quality replacement for the most valuable of all pigments: natural ultramarine. This was a color derived from lapis lazuli, a rare, semiprecious gemstone mined almost exclusively in Afghanistan since the 6th century, and imported to Europe through Venice. It is famously known to have been more costly than gold during the Renaissance. Natural ultramarine provided a brilliant, royal blue hue, but only if coarsely ground and applied in a comparatively translucent glaze over a light-reflecting ground. Other blue colors, such as smalt, which was essentially composed of particles of colored glass, were available to help achieve the lovely hues of ultramarine, but the poor covering ability of the paint and the difficulty of its preparation and use were familiar limitations.

    In 1824, the French government announced a competition among chemists to develop a true synthetic ultramarine. The prize was finally awarded in 1828 to Jean-Baptiste Guimet. Painters at last had an affordable, fully balanced palette of cool and warm colors spanning the full spectrum. This fact, combined with the innovation of ready-mixed tube oil colors, greatly facilitated the direct representation of nature. The ability of painters to capture a wide range of observed natural effects in the landscape en plein air are represented by the works of Corot, Guigou, Monticelli and Dupré. A Revolution of the Palette closes with two canvases representing the Impressionists’ full realization of the wide-open possibilities made possible by these new blues: Guillaumin’s The Seine at Charenton (formerly Daybreak) and Caillebotte’s Canoe on the Yerres River.

    A Revolution of the Palette: The First Synthetic Blues and Their Impact on French Artists is curated by Conservator John Griswold. A series of events will be offered in conjunction with the exhibition. Information can be found at nortonsimon.org/events.


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

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Fragonard’s Enterprise: The Artist and the Literature of Travel

July 17, 2015 - January 04, 2016


    P
    asadena, CA
    —The Norton Simon Museum presents Fragonard’s Enterprise: The Artist and the Literature of Travel, an exhibition that presents 60 drawings created by a young Jean-Honoré Fragonard (French, 1732–1806) during his first and most important stay in Italy in the mid-18th century. These exquisite works document Fragonard’s voyage to see the great artistic treasures of Florence, Bologna, and Padua, among other cities. Fragonard’s Enterprise explores the excitement of this expedition, the documentary and practical value of the drawings, and their history following publication, especially as they were treasured by later collectors.

    Before Fragonard ascended to the ranks of one of the 18th century’s most popular painters, he studied at the French Academy in Rome, where he practiced the fundamental art of drawing as a method to hone his skills and to establish his own unique style. In Rome, he encountered his first patron, Jean-Claude Richard de Saint-Non (1727–1791). A passionate advocate of the arts, Saint-Non was an eager participant in the Grand Tour, the educational pilgrimage to Italy then in vogue throughout Europe. His voyage, made from 1759 to 1761, inspired him to chronicle this experience for an audience that shared his fascination with the peninsula. Saint-Non invited the young Fragonard to join in his tour through Italy’s illustrious cities. In exchange, Fragonard was tasked with making copies after the important paintings and monuments to be seen in the churches and palazzi. The black chalk drawings Fragonard produced for his sponsor served as source material for Saint-Non’s engravings and aquatints, which were published in suites, and in his illustrated travel book Voyage pittoresque de Naples et de Sicile (1781–86). These immensely popular publications served as barometers of taste for the arts, and as beloved reminders of the masterpieces visited.

    Enthusiasm for classical antiquity and Neapolitan Baroque painting drew many tourists to Naples. Saint-Non enjoyed multiple visits to the city, and during Fragonard’s visit in March 1761, he created inspired copies after the masterpieces he visited in private and public spaces. Occasionally he combined subjects from different locations on one sheet of paper. 

    St. Luke Surrounded by Angels, for example, was copied from a fresco by Giovanni Lanfranco in the Church of the Holy Apostles. On the same sheet, Fragonard flanked Luke’s figure with two prophets that caught his attention at the Certosa di San Martino, painted by the Spaniard Jusepe de Ribera. The result of this imaginative pastiche is so fluid that few would suspect it was a combination drawing.

    With its sunlit canals and magnificent architecture, Venice proved irresistible to the Grand Tourist. Fragonard and Saint-Non passed more than a month there. Inspired by Titian, Tintoretto and Veronese, the French artist produced lively, free-spirited copies, as evidenced in his Study after Paolo Veronese’s Adoration of the Magi, 1582, from the Church of San Nicolò della Lattuga ai Frari. Fragonard shifted Veronese’s vertical format to a horizontal one, and deemphasized the architecture to concentrate on the rhythmic interweaving of the figures that he must have admired in the original.

    Fragonard’s Enterprise: The Artist and the Literature of Travel is organized by Curator Gloria Williams Sander. A series of events will be offered in conjunction with the exhibition. Information can be found at nortonsimon.org/events.


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible.Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

     

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Final Events for Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay Exhibition

May 13, 2015 - June 22, 2015

    Final Day of the Exhibition is Monday, June 22

    Pasadena, CA—The Norton Simon Museum concludes its installation of three paintings from the Musée d’Orsay’s renowned art collection: Édouard Manet’s Émile Zola, 1868, James Abbott McNeill Whistler’s Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871 (also known as Portrait of the Artist’s Mother), and Paul Cézanne’s The Card Players, 1892–96. These paintings are installed together in the Norton Simon Museum’s 19th-century wing, alongside paintings from the Simon collection by Manet, Cézanne and their contemporaries. The exhibition, titled Tête-à-tête: Three Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay, marks the first time the Manet and Cezanne paintings have been on view in Southern California. The Whistler, one of the icons of American art, was last on view in 1933.  


    Upcoming highlights include:

    Lecture
    Manet and His Writers: Baudelaire, Zola, Mallarmé
    Saturday, May 23, 4:00–5:00 p.m.
    Emily A. Beeny, Associate Curator, Norton Simon Museum
    Émile Zola, memorialized in Manet’s famous portrait, was not the only writer with whom Manet’s reputation was linked over the course of his career. The artist developed relationships with a number of French writers including three who were perhaps the most influential of their age: the late-Romantic poet Charles Baudelaire, the Naturalist novelist Émile Zola, and the elegant, elusive Symbolist Stéphane Mallarmé. Serving respectively as a mentor, an ally and a friend, Baudelaire, Zola and Mallarmé each saw something of himself in Manet and each bequeathed to posterity a different idea of the artist.

    Memorial Day
    Monday, May 25, 12:00–5:00 p.m.
    The Museum is open for the Memorial Day holiday.

    Guided Tours
    Masters of Tomorrow: Manet, Degas, Whistler and Cézanne
    Thursday, May 28, June 4, and June 11, 2:00–3:00 p.m.
    Celebrated French author Émile Zola described the then-unrecognized Manet as a "master of tomorrow." View remarkable works of art by 19th-century masters including Manet, Degas, Whistler, Cézanne and others. Online registration is required for these tours and can be completed at nortonsimon.org/events.

    Free Friday Night
    Friday, June 5, 5:00–8:00 p.m.
    The Norton Simon Museum offers free admission to all. Free timed tickets for Tête-à-tête are given out at the admissions desk starting at 5:00 p.m. Spend an enchanting evening enjoying the Museum’s galleries and garden.

    Film
    Le Cousin Jules
    Friday, June 12, 6:00–7:30 p.m.
    Directed by Dominique Benicheti
    The documentary Le Cousin Jules is a rare combination of sophisticated movie-making technique and an ode to the beauty of rural France, capturing the simplicity of daily peasant life, and the nearly wordless intimacy of a lifelong relationship. Over a five-year period, director Dominique Benicheti filmed the rhythms and rituals of blacksmith Jules Guiteaux and his wife Félicie, as Jules dons wooden clogs and leather apron to begin work in his shop, while Félicie tends a vegetable garden and prepares their meals. A ravishing and immersive work, the film allows viewers to enter not only into the subjects’ world, but also the very rhythms of their lives – providing a record of a time and a way of life that have long since vanished. Awarded the jury prize at the Locarno Film Festival in 1973 and widely acclaimed around the world, the film was beautifully restored in 2012. Not rated. In French, with English subtitles.


    WHERE: Norton Simon Museum, 411 West Colorado Boulevard in Pasadena, Located on the corner of Colorado and Orange Grove Boulevards at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. Parking at the Norton Simon Museum is free.

    ADMISSION: Entrance to the exhibition is included with admission, but the Museum offers convenient timed tickets for sale online at tickets.nortonsimon.org. Walk-up tickets are available for sale at the Admissions desk. All events are free with admission. Admission is $12.00 for adults; $9.00 for seniors; and free for Museum members, students with I.D., active military and everyone age 18 and under. The Museum is free for all on Friday, June 5, from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. Seating for our lectures and films is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

    For more information, the public may call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org.

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Exhibitions and Events Schedule

April 01, 2015 - June 30, 2015


    Pasadena, CA
    —The Norton Simon Museum announces its spring season of events and exhibitions. Unless otherwise stated, all events are free with admission. Tickets for ensured seating for lectures and concerts are distributed in the main entrance gallery one hour prior to event. Members enjoy early seatine.

    Please click on the PDF at the right to view the schedule. 

     


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

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Tête-à-tête: Three Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay

March 27, 2015 - June 22, 2015


    Pasadena, CA—
    This spring, the Norton Simon Museum presents an installation of three paintings from the Musée d’Orsay’s renowned art collection: Édouard Manet’s Émile Zola, 1868, James Abbott McNeill Whistler’s Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871 (also known as Portrait of the Artist’s Mother), and Paul Cézanne’s The Card Players, 1892–96. These paintings will hang together in the Norton Simon Museum’s 19th-century wing, alongside paintings from the Simon collection by Manet, Cézanne and their contemporaries. A small, bilingual publication and a series of lectures, tours, and films will be offered in conjunction with the installation. Entrance to the exhibition is included with general admission, but timed tickets are available for sale at tickets.nortonsimon.org.

    About the Paintings

    Whistler’s Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871
    It is perhaps the single most recognizable image in the history of American painting: the spare interior of an artist’s studio, a gray wall, a Japanese curtain, an aging subject soberly dressed and seated in profile. Whistler’s portrait of his mother, painted in the fall of 1871, marks the high point of his career. “It is rare,” wrote Whistler’s friend, the painter Jacques-émile Blanche, “that one can judge an artist by a single work.” Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, also known as Portrait of the Artist’s Mother, is such a work. Endlessly reproduced, imitated and parodied, the picture nonetheless resists any fixed interpretation. Given the painting’s iconic status in American culture, the fact that Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 resides not in the United States but in France may come as a surprise. Acquired by the French state in 1891 after a vigorous campaign by admirers including the painter Claude Monet and the poet Stéphane Mallarmé, Arrangement became the first American painting to enter the Louvre in 1925 and moved to the Musée d’Orsay with other 19th-century paintings when it opened in 1986. The painting last visited Southern California eighty-two years ago as part of a whirlwind tour of the United States, organized to promote Franco-American friendship. Heralded by the Los Angeles Times in February of that year as “a world symbol for the ideal of mother,” the painting attracted some 80,000 visitors to the Los Angeles County Museum of History, Science and Art in Exposition Park (predecessor to both LACMA and the Natural History Museum) between March 18 and April 5, 1933.

    Manet’s Émile Zola, 1868
    Like Whistler’s portrait of his mother, Manet’s portrait of Zola depicts a sitter intimately known to the artist. But while Whistler’s painting remains an “arrangement” somewhat remote in its treatment of its subject, Manet’s portrait of Zola is literally overflowing with tokens of friendship. Zola was still making a name for himself as a journalist in 1866 when he published a glowing newspaper article on Manet. In his article, Zola praised the frank modernity of Manet’s style, which had made the painter a divisive figure—and, indeed, a frequent object of ridicule—on the Paris art scene. One year later, when jury members for the Paris World’s Fair deemed Manet’s submissions too radical, the painter erected a pavilion on the edge of the fairgrounds where visitors could judge his work for themselves. His co-conspirator in this guerilla exhibition was none other than Zola, who re-published his latest article as a booklet titled Une nouvelle manière en peinture (A New Manner in Painting) on the occasion. To show his gratitude, Manet painted the writer’s portrait in January 1868. Depicting Zola as a connoisseur and scholar, Manet surrounded him with both art (a Japanese print, a print after Velázquez and a reproduction of Manet’s own Olympia) and books (including, of course, Zola’s own Une nouvelle manière en peinture).

    Cézanne’s The Card Players, c. 1892–96
    Of the whole Impressionist group, Cézanne was the least understood by his contemporaries. Stung by the unusually harsh criticism that greeted his work at the third Impressionist exhibition in 1877, Cézanne effectively withdrew from public exhibition for nearly 20 years, reemerging in a series of shows mounted by the progressive dealer Ambroise Vollard, when Cézanne came to be appreciated at last as the father of modern art. After his withdrawal from the public eye, Cézanne began to spend more time in the South of France, on his family’s property outside of Aix. There he focused on local landscapes, kitchen still lifes and a narrow cast of domestic models. The Card Players, painted between about 1892 and 1896, belongs to this last category, representing two workers seated at a table playing cards. The deceptive simplicity of the scene, the pyramidal composition and the network of short, hatch-like brushstrokes are all characteristics of Cézanne’s mature style. The painting is the first of three versions of the same composition that Cézanne made in the early 1890s (the others belong to the Courtauld Gallery in London and the Royal Family of Qatar). Cézanne’s sometimes agonized perfectionism drove him back to the same themes again and again, struggling to understand and convey not only what he saw but how he saw it.

    Simultaneous to the installation at the Norton Simon Museum, the Musée d’Orsay will exhibit three 19th-century masterpieces from the Simon collection: Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s The Pont des Arts, Paris, 1867–68, Vincent van Gogh’s Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier), 1888, and Édouard Vuillard’s First Fruits, 1899. While these three works were all created in France, none of them has been exhibited there since being purchased by Norton Simon in the 1960s and ’70s. The installation will present the paintings in three different galleries, hung alongside works by each artist.

    Tête-à-tête: Three Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay is organized by Chief Curator Carol Togneri and Associate Curator Emily A. Beeny. Entrance to the exhibition is included with general admission, but timed tickets are available for sale at tickets.nortonsimon.org.

    Related Publication

    Pas de deux: An Exchange of Masterpieces provides an in-depth look at six nineteenth-century masterworks, commemorating a historic collaboration between the Norton Simon Museum and the Musée d’Orsay. Co-authored by Stéphane Guégan and Emily A. Beeny, the book contains bilingual essays on three paintings from the Musée d’Orsay collection: Manet’s 1868 Portrait of Émile Zola, Whistler’s 1871 Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 (Portrait of the Artist’s Mother), and Cézanne’s ca. 1892-96 The Card Players—and three paintings from the Norton Simon: Renoir’s ca. 1867 Pont des Arts, Paris, Van Gogh’s 1888 Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier), and Vuillard’s 1899 First Fruits.

    Paperbound, 64 pages, 11 x 8 inches, bilingual in English and French
    Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena/Musée d’Orsay, Paris, 2015, $15.96 plus tax


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit www.cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

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Norton Simon Museum and Musée d’Orsay Announce Exchange of Masterpieces

March 27, 2015 - June 22, 2015

    Three paintings from each institution will be on view this spring

    Pasadena and Paris—The Norton Simon Museum and the Musée d’Orsay are pleased to announce an exchange of six paintings (three from each museum) in the spring of 2015 (March 27 – June 22, 2015), with simultaneous exhibitions in Pasadena and Paris. The exhibition held at the Simon will comprise Édouard Manet’s Emile Zola, 1868, James Abbott McNeill Whistler’s Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871 (also known as Portrait of the Artist’s Mother), and Paul Cézanne’s The Card Players, c. 1892–96. The exhibition at the Orsay will comprise Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s The Pont des Arts, Paris, 1867–68, Vincent van Gogh’s Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier), 1888, and Édouard Vuillard’s First Fruits, 1899. A small, bilingual publication with in-depth essays on the six paintings will accompany the installations.

    “We are extremely honored to forge this special exchange with the esteemed Musée d’Orsay, the preeminent institution in the world for 19th- and early 20th-century art,” says Norton Simon Museum President Walter W. Timoshuk. “Visitors to the Norton Simon will come face to face with three of the most beloved works from the Orsay’s peerless collection—in particular Whistler’s iconic portrait of his mother, which has visited Los Angeles only once before, very briefly, in the early 1930s. And we are delighted that this exchange will allow us to share with the Orsay’s visitors three highlights from our own 19th-century collection, works by Renoir, Van Gogh and Vuillard, that rarely leave Pasadena.”

    “The Norton Simon Museum is legendary as the repository for many masterpieces rarely shown outside Pasadena,” says Guy Cogeval, President of the Orsay and Orangerie Museums. “The Musée d’Orsay visitors will therefore be given a unique occasion to make marvelous discoveries as some of these will be shown alongside a selection of paintings from its own collection. The First Fruit by Vuillard will be a climax, as it once belonged to Léon Blum, one of the great 20th-century French political leaders. I am delighted that in return Manet, Cézanne and above all Whistler, so much loved by the American public, should be loaned as ambassadors of the Musée d’Orsay in California.”


    About the Norton Simon Museum Exhibition

    Tête-à-Tête: Three Masterpieces from the Musée d’Orsay
    March 27 – June 22, 2015

    This spring, the Norton Simon Museum presents an installation of three paintings from the Musée d’Orsay’s renowned collection of Impressionist art. Organized by Chief Curator Carol Togneri with Associate Curator Emily Beeny, the installation features Édouard Manet’s Emile Zola, 1868, James Abbott McNeill Whistler’s Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871 (also known as Portrait of the Artist’s Mother), and Paul Cézanne’s Card Players, 1892–96. The Orsay paintings will hang together in the Norton Simon Museum’s 19th-century wing, alongside paintings from the Simon collection by Manet, Cézanne and their peers. A series of lectures, tours, films, and family programs will be offered in conjunction with the installation. Timed tickets will be available for sale beginning in January 2015.

    Whistler’s Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, 1871
    It is perhaps the single most recognizable image in the history of American painting: the spare interior of an artist’s studio, a gray wall, a Japanese curtain, an aging subject soberly dressed and seated in profile. Whistler’s portrait of his mother, painted in the fall of 1871, marks the high point of his career. “It is rare,” wrote Whistler’s friend, the painter Jacques-émile Blanche, “that one can judge an artist by a single work.” Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1, also known as Portrait of the Artist’s Mother, is that single work. Endlessly reproduced, imitated and parodied, the picture nonetheless resists any fixed interpretation. Given the painting’s iconic status in American culture, the fact that Arrangement in Grey and Black No. 1 resides not in the United States but in France may come as a surprise. Acquired by the French state in 1891 after a vigorous campaign by admirers including the painter Claude Monet and the poet Stéphane Mallarmé, Arrangement hung first at the Louvre, and then moved to the Musée d’Orsay when it opened in 1986.

    Manet’s Emile Zola, 1868
    Like Whistler’s portrait of his mother, Manet’s portrait of Zola depicts a sitter intimately known to the artist. But while Whistler’s painting remains an “arrangement” somewhat remote in its treatment of its subject, Manet’s portrait of Zola is literally overflowing with tokens of friendship. Zola was still making a name for himself as a journalist in 1866 when he published a glowing newspaper article on Manet. In his article, Zola praised the frank modernity of Manet’s style, which had made the painter a divisive figure—and, indeed, a frequent object of ridicule—on the Paris art scene. One year later, when jury members for the Paris World’s Fair deemed Manet’s submissions too radical, the painter erected a pavilion on the edge of the fairgrounds where visitors could judge his work for themselves. His co-conspirator in this guerilla exhibition was none other than Zola, who re-published his article as a booklet titled Une nouvelle manière en peinture (A New Manner in Painting) on the occasion. To show his gratitude, Manet painted the writer’s portrait in January 1868. Depicting Zola as a connoisseur and scholar, Manet surrounded him with both art (a Japanese print, an engraving after Velázquez and an etching of Manet’s own Olympia) and books (including, of course, Zola’s own Une nouvelle manière en peinture).

    Cézanne’s The Card Players, c. 1892–96
    Of the whole Impressionist group, Cézanne was the least understood by his contemporaries. Stung by the unusually harsh criticism that greeted his work at the third Impressionist exhibition in 1877, Cézanne effectively withdrew from public exhibition for nearly 20 years, reemerging in a series of shows mounted by the progressive dealer Ambroise Vollard, when Cézanne came to be appreciated at last as the father of modern art. After his withdrawal from the public eye, Cézanne began to spend more time in the South of France, on his family’s property outside of Aix. There he focused on local landscapes, kitchen still lifes and a narrow cast of domestic models. The Card Players, painted between about 1892 and 1896, belongs to this last category, representing two workers seated at a table playing cards. The deceptive simplicity of the scene, the pyramidal composition and the network of short, hatch-like brushstrokes are all characteristics of Cézanne’s mature style. The painting is the first of three versions of the same composition that Cézanne made in the early 1890s (the others belong to the Courtauld Institute in London and the Royal Family of Qatar). Cézanne’s sometimes agonized perfectionism drove him back to the same themes again and again, struggling to understand and convey not only what he saw but how he saw it.

    About the Musée D’Orsay Exhibition

    Simultaneous to the installation at the Norton Simon Museum, the Musée D’Orsay will exhibit three 19th-century masterpieces from the Simon collection: Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s The Pont des Arts, Paris, 1867–68, Vincent van Gogh’s Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier), 1888, and Édouard Vuillard’s First Fruits, 1899. While these three works were all created in France, none of them has been exhibited there since being purchased by Norton Simon in the 1960s and ’70s. The installation will present the paintings in three different galleries, hung alongside works by each artist.

    Renoir’s The Pont des Arts, Paris, 1867–68
    Renoir’s picture plants us in the heart of Paris, standing on the Left Bank of the Seine, looking upstream towards the wrought-iron Pont des Arts on a sunny afternoon. A ferry pulls up to the quayside, which is crowded with commuters and idlers from all walks of life seated quietly on the riverbank: leisured ladies in bright dresses and smartly dressed dandies, scrappy street urchins and imperial soldiers, romping dogs and a blue-smocked working man. Up the ramp at right, second-hand booksellers do a brisk trade in the shadow of the Institut de France, a gracious 17th-century building whose dome surveys the bustle below. The picture’s crisp shadows and liberally applied black are not what we think of first when we think of Renoir: such features may surprise viewers better acquainted with the feathery touch and opalescent palette of his later Impressionist work. This scene dates to the very beginning of Renoir’s career, when the artist and his young friend Claude Monet set out to document the city they loved in a series of brisk urban landscapes, filled with all the verve of the modern metropolis.

    Van Gogh’s Portrait of a Peasant (Patience Escalier), 1888
    In February 1888, after two years in Paris, Van Gogh struck out for the South of France, in search of “blue tones and gay colors,” as well as relief from the low spirits and ill health that had afflicted him in the French art capital. Van Gogh settled in Arles, a small town whose surrounding countryside reminded him of the vividly colored Japanese prints he so admired. It was in Arles that he turned with new dedication to portraiture and forged his unmistakable style, characterized by intense, almost hallucinatory color applied with expressive daring. Painted in the vivid tones of a Japanese print and capturing the weathered features of Patience Escalier, a local gardener, this portrait marks the flowering of the artist’s ambitions and captures what Van Gogh described as the “sun-steeped, sunburnt quality, tanned and air-swept” of both the old man’s face and his vision in Arles.

    Vuillard’s First Fruits, 1899
    At over 14 feet across, First Fruits is the largest canvas Vuillard ever painted and arguably the crowning achievement of his career. It is one of a pair commissioned in 1899 by the banker Adam Natanson to decorate the library of his Parisian townhouse. The picture opens a broad prospect of woods and fields receding in two directions: along a footpath to a distant cluster of houses at left, and down a cart track towards a blue-kerchiefed woman at right. A child facing the landscape in the left foreground serves as a stand-in for the observer. This landscape was likely sketched from the window of a rented villa in the Paris suburb of L’Etang-la-Ville, where Vuillard spent the summer of 1899 with his sister, her husband and their young daughter, a great favorite with her uncle, who may have inspired the sturdy little figure in the foreground. Despite its grand dimensions, this is an intimate scene, more observed than invented, drawing on the ordinary pleasures of a family holiday.

    About the Norton Simon Museum
    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of Indian and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., active military and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

    About the Musée d’Orsay
    The national museum of the Musée d'Orsay opened to the public on Dec. 9, 1986, to show the great diversity of artistic creation in the Western world between 1848 and 1914. It was formed with the national collections coming mainly from three establishments: from the Louvre museum, with the works of artists born after 1820 or coming to the fore during the Second Republic; from the Musée du Jeu de Paume, which since 1947 had been devoted to Impressionism; and lastly from the National Museum of Modern Art, which, when it moved in 1976 to the Centre Georges Pompidou, only kept works of artists born after 1870. The museum is located in the center of Paris on the banks of the Seine, opposite the Tuileries Gardens. Its name comes from the history of the building, as the museum was installed in the former Orsay railway station, built for the Universal Exhibition of 1900.

    Open daily, except Mondays, 9:30 a.m. – 6 p.m., Thursdays until 9:45 p.m. Museum entrance ticket: full rate €11; concessions: €8.50. Access through the main entrance, 1, rue de la Légion d'Honneur, 75007 Paris. Information and switchboard: +33 (0)1 40 49 48 14.

Von SternbergColumbia Ice Field Canada FULL

Human/Nature: Photographers Constructing the Natural World

March 06, 2015 - August 31, 2015


    Pasadena, CA
    —The Norton Simon Museum presents Human/Nature: Photographers Constructing the Natural World, an exhibition of 24 works that demonstrate how photographers in the 1960s and ’70s approached “nature” and “culture” in their images, not in opposition, but rather in dialogue. Up until then, landscape photography had mostly minimized evidence of human presence; indeed, the most renowned images in the genre presented pristine vistas that photographer Lewis Baltz wryly characterized as “the privileged world of pure nature.” The 10 artists in Human/Nature play with and against this tradition, treating signs of humanity, and our activities, as essential elements of their image-making practice.

    Against the Modernist—some would say, Romantic—tradition of canonical figures like Edward Weston and Ansel Adams, photographers in the 1960s and ’70s began to focus on landscapes beyond “pure nature.” During this period, photography that included and even emphasized human alterations to the landscape became a legitimate avenue for artistic consideration. Baltz, whose studies of California tract houses exemplified this new approach, recalled that “my life very rarely involved going to Yosemite [National Park in California]. My life was about going to shopping centers, being in a town, an urban situation, which seemed to me was also a landscape, but one that no one had any interest in looking at. But I was interested in looking at it.” Along these lines, Baltz, Victor Landweber, Robert von Sternberg and others pictured landscapes marked by urban and suburban life, tourism and industry. 

    While such transformed landscapes are distinguished by their innovative subjects and their formal beauty, they also invite critical conversations around the impact of our interactions with the non-human world. In his Auduboniana series (1998–2001), Landweber superimposes etched birds from John James Audubon’s Birds of America (1827–1838) over modern urban architecture, creating suggestive contrasts between pre-industrial and contemporary American life. Passenger Pigeon, Federal Building, Oakland CA (1998) is especially poignant. From a population of billions, over-hunting and habitat depredation drove the passenger pigeon to extinction in 1914. In another striking juxtaposition, the bright orange traffic cone that punctuates Von Sternberg’s Columbia Ice Field, Canada (2009) may be a playful, unexpected splash of color in an otherwise stark landscape, but it is also a reminder of the many snow coaches that carry tourists as far as the remote Canadian Rockies.

    A number of artists in Human/Nature explore a particular paradox: photographers must use uniquely human technologies in their representations of the non-human world. These artists revel in scenarios where the natural and the man-made meet and blend. Darryl Curran, Robert Fichter, Kenneth Josephson and other artists place trees, plants and vegetables in communication with innovative technical processes, from the flatbed scanner to the smartphone. The lush, tactile surface of the tree trunk in Josephson’s Chicago (1964) pays homage to Modernist formalism, but its nested composition is conceptually complex: Chicago is a picture of a tree within a picture of a tree within a picture of a tree. Josephson here probes the camera’s mediating role between natural and human artistry. In his use of snapshots, Josephson also gestures to the proliferation of instant photography, most famously the Polaroid. In more recent years, Fichter has photographed landscapes using another cutting-edge, instantaneous process with widespread appeal: the iPhone’s panorama mode.

    Two artists in the exhibition, Curran and Jane O’Neal, use flatbed scanners to capture their compositions. Curran’s flattened arrangement of colorful cabbage leaves, delicate baby’s breath, thorny rose stems and a serrated knife on the surface of the scanner links Savoy Cabbage, Baby’s Breath, Blade (1995) to the photograms and cyanotypes of early photography, in which objects were arranged on photo-sensitive paper, and which likewise often featured a blend of natural objects and man-made artifacts. The inclusion of a knife among the cut leaves and stems signals human presence—and, perhaps, humanity’s power to destroy as well as to construct.

    From subtle to arresting, lyrical to critical, the photographs in Human/Nature present a world mediated by human activity. This exhibition is on view in the Museum’s small rotating exhibitions gallery on the main level from March 6 through Aug. 31.

    Cited: Lewis Baltz, Oral history interview, 2009 November 15-17, Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution. Image credit on previous page: Auduboniana: Passenger Pigeon, Federal Building, Oakland, CA, 1998, Victor Landweber (American, b. 1943), Digital pigment print, 19 x 13 in. (48.3 x 33 cm), Norton Simon Museum, Gift of Alan, Shelley and Lucinda Stamm. PH.2010.3.2, © Norton Simon Museum


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

GardenMoore

Sculpture Garden Celebration Continues

March 01, 2015 - August 31, 2015


    A highlight will be the publication of a book, with an essay by landscape designer Nancy Goslee Power and principal photography by Tim Street-Porter

    Pasadena, CA—Beginning in October 2014, the Norton Simon Museum marks the 15th anniversary of its sculpture garden with a yearlong celebration, including special programming and the publication of a book.

    Designed by renowned landscape designer Nancy Goslee Power, the Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden has been a highlight for visitors since it was unveiled in October 1999. Works by Aristide Maillol, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Auguste Rodin, Jacques Lipchitz and others are installed throughout the Museum’s lush and vibrant gardens.

    To commemorate this milestone, the Norton Simon Museum is organizing a series of monthly events that focus on the garden, including lectures, outdoor concerts, art-making programs for adults and families, tours and focus nights. The first event, presented on Saturday, Oct. 11, 2014, will be a panel discussion about the renovation with Power, Norton Simon foundations Trustee and retired Museum Director of Art Sara Campbell and Museum Director of Operations John Sudolcan, moderated by Museum Chief Curator Carol Togneri. Also in October, the Museum will publish a free garden guide that offers visitors a map of the grounds and information on many of the plants and sculptures found throughout.

    In spring 2015, a visually enticing book on the sculpture garden will be published. With chapters on the history of the property and the works of art installed on the grounds written by Museum staff, along with an essay on the extensive transformation in the 1990s written by Power, this publication will provide readers with an extensive overview of the garden. Throughout the publication will be gorgeous images by celebrated photographer Tim Street-Porter, whom the Norton Simon foundations commissioned to photograph the garden over the course of a year.

    More information on the book, as well as a full schedule of events, will be available later this year.


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.

Garden full

Sculpture Garden Anniversary Celebration

October 01, 2014 - September 30, 2015


    Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden Celebration Continues

    A highlight is the release this spring of the new publication
    A Living Work of Art: The Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden

    Pasadena, CA—The Norton Simon Museum continues its celebration of the 15th anniversary of its sculpture garden with special programming and the publication of a book. Designed by renowned landscape designer Nancy Goslee Power, the Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden has been a highlight for visitors since it was unveiled in October 1999. Works by Aristide Maillol, Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Auguste Rodin, Jacques Lipchitz and others are installed throughout the Museum’s lush and vibrant gardens.

    To commemorate this milestone, the Norton Simon Museum launched a yearlong celebration of the Sculpture Garden last October. The inaugural event was a lively discussion with Power and Museum staff who were involved in the renovation. At the same time, the Museum published a new, free Garden Guide, launched an updated web section (nortonsimon.org/garden) and organized a series of special tours and family programs.

    This spring, the focus continues with the launch of a book, titled A Living Work of Art: The Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden (Norton Simon Museum, $50). Designed by Marquand Books and distributed by ACC Distribution, New York, this handsome publication provides an in-depth examination into the Museum’s garden and the sculpture it contains. The introductory chapter, chock full of rarely seen archival images, tells of the land’s early settlers and its transformation into Carmelita Gardens and later the Pasadena Art Museum. Next, Power tells of the inspiration and hard work that led to the reimagined Sculpture Garden in the 1990s. Finally, essays by museum curators on each of the 40 sculptures in the Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden provide a wonderful overview of artwork by some of the most renowned artists of the 19th and 20th century. Throughout the publication are more than 100 photographs of the garden and sculpture taken by Tim Street-Porter. Street-Porter, a well-known landscape and architectural photographer based in Los Angeles, was commissioned by the Norton Simon foundations to photograph the garden over the course of four seasons.

    Publication Information:
    A Living Work of Art: The Norton Simon Museum Sculpture Garden
    General Editors: Leslie C. Denk and Carol Togneri
    Norton Simon Museum
    10” x 11”, 136 pages, Hardcover
    103 color illustrations, 22 archival illustrations
    Retail price: $50
    ISBN: 978-0-9891956-1-4
    Publication Date: May 11, 2015
    Available at the Norton Simon Museum bookstore: store.nortonsimon.org | (626) 844-6942 | [email protected]; or through ACC Distribution, New York.


    About the Norton Simon Museum

    The Norton Simon Museum is known around the world as one of the most remarkable private art collections ever assembled. Over a 30-year period, industrialist Norton Simon (1907–1993) amassed an astonishing collection of European art from the Renaissance to the 20th century, and a stellar collection of South and Southeast Asian art spanning 2,000 years. Modern and Contemporary Art from Europe and the United States, acquired by the former Pasadena Art Museum, also occupies an important place in the Museum’s collections. The Museum houses more than 12,000 objects, roughly 1,000 of which are on view in the galleries and gardens. Two temporary exhibition spaces feature rotating installations of artworks not on permanent display.

    Location: The Norton Simon Museum is located at 411 W. Colorado Blvd. at Orange Grove Boulevard in Pasadena, Calif., at the intersection of the Foothill (210) and Ventura (134) freeways. For general Museum information, please call (626) 449-6840 or visit www.nortonsimon.org. Hours: The Museum is open Monday, Wednesday and Thursday from noon to 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed on Tuesday. Admission: General admission is $12 for adults and $9 for seniors. Members, students with I.D., and patrons age 18 and under are admitted free of charge. Admission is free for everyone on the first Friday of every month from 5 to 8 p.m. All public programs, unless stated otherwise, are free with admission. The Museum is wheelchair accessible. Parking: Parking is free, and no reservations are necessary. Public Transportation: The City of Pasadena provides a shuttle bus to transport passengers through the Pasadena Playhouse district, the Lake Avenue shopping district and Old Pasadena. A shuttle stop is located in front of the Museum. Please visit cityofpasadena.net/artsbus for schedules. The MTA bus line #180/181 stops in front of the Museum. The Memorial Park Station on the MTA Gold Line, the closest Metro Rail station to the Museum, is located at 125 E. Holly St. at Arroyo Parkway. Please visit www.metro.net for schedules.